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Oxtail 

Raw oxtail - wikipedia.org

As one might expect, it is literally the tail of the oxen or steer and is a hefty piece of meat weighing in anywhere between 2-4 pounds. It is often used in stews and soups and is meat considered rich and palatable. Many cultures use oxtail as a staple in their diets. There are recipes for Jamaican Oxtail Stew, Chinese Braised Oxtail Stew, Australian Oxtail Soup, Hamburg Oxtail Stew, Eastern European Oxtail Barley Soup, Spanish Braised Oxtail, and Roman Oxtail Stew, just to name a few. Once the tail is butchered from the ox or steer, it must then be skinned. Most people cut it into strips or sections. It is extremely bony and muscular, but it’s that strong muscular tendency that gives oxtail its unique, strong, complex flavor.

Oxtail is a bony, gelatinous meat, and is usually slow-cooked, often stewed or braised. It is a good stock base for a soup. Oxtail is the main ingredient of the Italian dish coda alla vaccinara. It is a popular flavour for powder, instant and premade canned soups in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Versions of oxtail soup are popular traditional dishes in South America, West Africa, China, and Indonesia. In Korean cuisine, a soup made with oxtail is called kkori gomtang (꼬리곰탕). It is a thick soup seasoned with salt and eaten with a bowl of rice. It can be used as a stock for making tteokguk (rice cake soup). Stewed oxtail with butter beans or as main dish (with rice) is popular in Jamaica, Trinidad, and other West Indian cultures. Oxtail is also eaten in southern parts of Africa like Zimbabwe and served with sadza and greens.

In the United States, oxtail has the meat-cutting classification NAMP 1791.

Data provided by wikipedia.org